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What you Should Know

Doberman Pinscher

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The Daring and Dandy Doberman Pinscher Breed of Dog
By: Tippy & Alfred



The Doberman Pinscher dog breed is one of the most
recognized in the world, partially because of their
popularity as guard dogs in cinema. The breed was created
very deliberately in the late 1800's by a German tax
collector named Louis Dobermann to be a protection and
companion dog. The foundation breeds included Rottweilers,
German Shepherds, Greyhounds, Pinschers and Beaucerons.

Adult Doberman Pinschers look lean, powerful, poised and
alert. They have a broad, deep chest and a square and
muscular body. The head is wedge-shaped, the nose is long
and the ears are cropped to stand up or left with the
natural lop. They often have docked tails, but if not the
tail is long and powerful. (Cropping ears and docking tails
are less fashionable today and are even banned in many
countries.)

Standards for the breed require that adult Doberman
Pinschers stand from twenty-four to twenty-eight inches
(sixty-one to seventy-one centimeters) and most weigh
between sixty-six and ninety pounds (thirty to forty-one
kilograms). The overall impression should be of a powerful,
proud and determined dog.

The coat of a Doberman Pinscher is sleek and thick, and the
hair is very short. Acceptable colors include black and
rust, black and tan, red and fawn. Blue and fawn are not
accepted in International competitions, however. There
should be rust points above each eye as well as on the
muzzle, throat and forechest, on all four legs and feet, and
below the tail.

True to Louis Dobermann's plan, the Doberman Pinscher
continues to be a large, energetic, fearless, alert, loyal,
intelligent and obedient dog. Dobermans love their owners
and most will defend their families and the family's
property to the death.

Like the breeds from which they descended, Doberman
Pinschers are excellent for police, guard, search and
rescue, agility, therapy and service work. Despite their
sometimes frightening appearance and reputation, according
to the US Centers for Disease Control Dobermans are less
likely to attack humans than German Shepherds, Rottweilers,
Pit Bulls or Alaskan Malamutes.

Dobermans are very people-oriented dogs and need to be well-
socialized with other dogs and to be a well-trained part of
the family. A properly trained Doberman Pinscher is a great
family pet that will play nicely with children and other
pets and alert of and defend the family against any
potential danger.


Picture of Doberman Pinscher Dog




Medical Problems plus Dog Food Doberman Pinschers
Jane R. Bicks, D.V.M.


Intelligent, loyal, and dedicated, the Doberman
Pinscher is not without it's physical problems.


Skin disease is common in all Dobermans, particularly
blue ones. A quality alternative food is a must,
supplemented with vegetable enzymes and bee pollen,
algae, or spirulina.


For the Ultimate Pet food for your
Doberman: See my endorsement here



Dandruff is not necessarily from dry skin, so before
you start adding a fatty acid supplement, check to
see if your Doberman, like many, is hypothyroid. If
that is the case, you want your supplement to contain
kelp or sea algae.


As with any skin problem, brewer's yeast and garlic is
the treat of choice.


Just in case your Doberman is a candidate for 
Van Willebrand's disease, add liver to it's diet or
feed liver treats at least once weekly.

If anemia is a problem, Pet Tinic is a good supplement.


Healthy Treats for your Doberman Pinscher


See Also:

All about Different Dog Breeds

The Ultimate in Gift Items for Dobermans and all Breeds


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Precious & Cute Plush Dobermans & Dogs & Animals

Charming Doberman Pinscher & Dog Calendars


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